October 06, 2013

Nina Williams Nude - ClickBait Edition





Tekken Nina Williams SoulCalibur
With Namco's recent trademark filing for SoulCalibur Unbreakable Soul, plus SoulCalibur Lost Swords and SoulCalibur 2 HD Online releasing later this year, this thought came back to me again; Nina in a Soul game - why isn't this a thing already? Tekken's Yoshimitsu has been a member of the cast since 1998's SoulCalibur, Heihachi was a playable guest character in SoulCalibur 2 and, above all, Namco themselves planted the idea of an iron clad, sword fighting, medieval version of Nina into my head with her Tekken 5 ending FMV - a major tease if ever there was one. So here's my request, Namco: Nina Williams for SoulCalibur6/7/whateverIcanWait6! And while you're at it (cos I know one of the three people reading this blog MUST be working for Namco, dead sure...) click "read more" to get an idea of the kind of "damage models" your next gen Soul game should feature (...)



Soul Calibur Nina Williams Tekken
Tekken Nina Nude SoulCalibur
Nina Williams Nude Tekken Soul Calibur
Nina Williams Nude Bazookas
Only half kidding...

9 comments:

  1. I have Death by Degrees - awesome game. Now i just want Death by Degrees 2 and not need more anything for me.

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    Replies
    1. Unfortunately, after the critical and commercial failure of the title in 2005, I think it's pretty safe to say that there will never be a second Death by Degrees game, especially not with the state the industry is in right now and the way it's heading. Luckily Tekken is here to stay, and with a new generation of hardware just around the corner and Namco exploring new mediums for their franchises, there's a stream of exciting new stuff just waiting for us to happily drown in.

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    2. Okay, so ...
      Any chance to see DBD 2 on kickstarter? I have money, many money and i ready donate.
      Why not make DBD 2 for Playstation 2 ? I really don't understand Namco. :(

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    3. Okay, let's break this down:

      - 1: PlayStation 2 is considered a dead format. The last few wide releases it's had were ports of Wii titles, released purely because it was dirt cheap and easy to remove the motion control compatibility. Even small studios don't support the system now, since it's easier to make their titles digital downloads and release them to PS Store or XBLA, where they will reach a potentially massive audience.

      - 2: Big public companies like Namco have no business using Kickstarter for anything, ever.

      - 3: The more complicated and 'powerful' games consoles get, the more expensive games become to make. Even subtracting the cost of more high-tech computer rigs needed for design, simply taking advantage of the machines' ability to throw more polygons and textures around at once means drawing more detail than before, which equals more staff spending more man hours, for which they have to be paid because, y'know...work.

      - 4: As games become more expensive, the companies making them become more careful with their money. Unless the developers can find a way to meet their targets very economically, their bosses will only green-light the creation of titles that are considered safe investments, i.e. appealing to the existing market. (example: we are presently drowning in modern combat FPS games because lots of people buy Call of Duty every year and other companies want some of that money)

      - 5: A sequel to Death by Degrees - a now 8-years-old game that received middling grades from critics (at best) and which sold unremarkable numbers - is not going to be considered a safe investment. Its potential audience is a small niche - in fact, the fighting game audience is a niche itself, and we're talking here about selling a game based on the likeness of ONE character from ONE particular fighting game series, so it's a niche three times over. Unless there's a sudden sea change in the popularity of fighting games, or games with female leads suddenly become super-popular (and given that the last Tomb Raider shifted 3 million units and was still a 'disappointment' I'm not holding out hope), there simply is no chance of Namco's higher-ups being willing to shell out the kind of money it would take to make a respectable action-adventure title starring Nina in the foreseeable future.

      That's the long and short of it.

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    4. " Its potential audience is a small niche - in fact, the fighting game audience is a niche itself, and we're talking here about selling a game based on the likeness of ONE character from ONE particular fighting game series, so it's a niche three times over. "
      But DbD have over 300 000+ copies sold in world. However, some games are sold fewer copies on Playstation 2 / 3 and still have a sequel, why?

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    5. 300,000 copies is not nearly as much as it sounds. TTT2, at last count, had sold 1.7 million copies, and that number is considered a 'disappointment' to many at Namco. And something like a DbD sequel might wind up costing more to make than a new core Tekken, since it would need to be built from scratch; you can't recycle the game engine of something as old as DbD and expect it to hold up on modern tech (especially since said engine didn't run that great to start with).

      R.e. those other games you mentioned, there is no one single answer. Some of them may have been made dirt cheap, or their publishers weren't expecting even modest success and were very happy with what little it managed. Maybe they were released by smaller publishing companies who don't expect to shift as many units as the big dogs even on a good day, and so don't let the numbers get in the way of sequels. Or, maybe those games got lucky and had a senior producer in their company who believed strongly in the title even when the public didn't, and forced a sequel into existence as a personal project. Unfortunately, no-one at Namco seems to have ever felt that way about DbD.

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    6. "And something like a DbD sequel might wind up costing more to make than a new core Tekken, since it would need to be built from scratch; you can't recycle the game engine of something as old as DbD and expect it to hold up on modern tech (especially since said engine didn't run that great to start with)."
      But why not used Unreal Engine 3 for DbD 2, Namco already have all rights on used Unreal Engine 3.

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  2. Oh you cheeky bugger. :D

    But yeah, I'd appreciate this in a Soul game way more than a CAS version of Harada-san or bloody Spawn...

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  3. "Big public companies like Namco have no business using Kickstarter for anything, ever."
    But Kickstarter - it's future game industry. Why they do not understand?
    Without Kickstarter i would never be able to play in this wonderful game http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvNnvPiE9Lc and this game http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMe99_NXBKk

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